Mandatory Retirement Upheld by S.C.C.

McKinney v. University of Guelph (1990), 13 C.H.R.R. D/171 (S.C.C.)

English:   By a majority, the Supreme Court of Canada rules that mandatory retirement at age 65 is a reasonable limit on the s. 15 right to be protected from discrimination because of age. In five different judgments, the Supreme Court hands down a split 5-2 decision.

This is an appeal from a decision of the Ontario Court of Appeal which dismissed the applications of eight professors and a librarian at four Ontario universities for declarations that the policies of the universities requiring them to retire at age 65 violate s. 15, and that s. 9(a) of the Ontario Human Rights Code, by failing to protect those over age 65, also violates s. 15.

The issues before the Court are:

  1. whether the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms applies to universities;
  2. if the Charter does apply to universities, whether mandatory retirement policies violate s. 15;
  3. whether the limitation of the prohibition against age discrimination in the Ontario Human Rights Code to persons between the ages of 18 and 65 violates s. 15; and
  4. if the limitation does violate s. 15, whether it is justifiable under s. 1 as a reasonable limit on an equality right.

La Forest J., writing for the majority, states that the Charter is essentially an instrument for checking the power of government over the individual. Private activity was deliberately excluded from the Charter's ambit. While it is true that the rights of individuals can be offended by private actors, governments can regulate in this sphere or create distinct bodies for the protection of human rights. Constitutional review of private action is not mandated by the Charter and it would diminish the area of freedom within which individuals can act.

Section 32 of the Charter states that the Charter applies to the legislature and government of each province. The majority finds that universities are not part of government within the meaning of s. 32. The Court rejects arguments that the Charter applies to universities because they are creatures of statute carrying out an important public service, or because their survival depends on government funding, or because their powers, objects, activities and governing structures are determined by government. Despite all of these controls, the majority finds, universities are legally autonomous; they control their own affairs and enjoy independence from government regarding all important internal matters. Their decisions are not government decisions.

Though the majority of the Court rules that the Charter does not apply to universities, they nonetheless consider the question of whether university mandatory retirement policies offend s. 15.

First, the majority decides that if the universities were part of the fabric of government, their policies on mandatory retirement would amount to "law" within the meaning of s. 15. All actions taken pursuant to powers granted by law, not merely legislative activities, will fall within the ambit of s. 15 of the Charter.

The majority then finds that the mandatory retirement policies of the universities violate s. 15. Mandatory retirement deprives a person of work, which is one of the most fundamental aspects of a person's life, based on the assumption that, because of age, the individual is less competent than younger persons.

However, the mandatory retirement policies would be saved by s. 1 because they are a reasonable limit on the equality rights guaranteed to older persons.

The universities' objectives for the mandatory retirement policies are pressing and substantial. These objectives are to enhance their capacity to seek and maintain excellence by permitting flexibility in resource allocation and faculty renewal, and to preserve academic freedom and the collegial form of association by minimizing intrusive modes of performance appraisal.

Mandatory retirement, the majority finds, supports the tenure system by obviating the need for elaborate evaluation schemes, and ensures continuing faculty renewal by making spaces available in a closed system for new and younger faculty members. Therefore, there is a rational connection between the university policies and the objectives sought to be achieved.

On the issue of whether the policies impair the rights of older workers as little as possible, the majority rules that the test to be applied is not whether the right is impaired as little as possible but whether the university had a reasonable basis for concluding that the policy impaired the right as little as possible. This is a relaxed s. 1 test, adopted in Irwin Toy Ltd. v. Quebec (Attorney General) to provide greater flexibility in assessing those cases where legislatures have had to make difficult choices between the claims of competing groups.

In this case, the majority concludes that there was a reasonable basis for concluding that the policy impaired the right as little as possible because mandatory retirement is not wholly detrimental to the group affected. The policy ensures that faculty members have a large measure of academic freedom and it is generally beneficial both to the universities and the individuals in them. Consequently, the minimal impairment of rights does not outweigh the universities' pressing and substantial objectives.

However, since the majority has ruled that the Charter does not apply to universities, the Court turns to the issue of whether the limitation of protection from age discrimination in s. 9(a) of the Ontario Human Rights Code to persons between 18 and 65, which allows mandatory retirement policies to exist for those 65 and over, is unconstitutional because it violates s. 15. Some of the faculty members who are the appellants in this case attempted to file complaints with the Ontario Human Rights Commission, but their complaints were refused because of the restricted jurisdiction of the Commission with respect to age discrimination.

The majority of the Court finds that policies of mandatory retirement were developed with the introduction of private and public pension plans. Mandatory retirement policies have had a profound impact on the organization of the workplace and on the structuring of pension plans, on fairness and security of tenure in the workplace, and on work opportunities for others. One of the objectives of s. 9(a) of the Ontario Human Rights Code was to arrive at a legislative compromise between protecting individuals from discrimination and giving employers and employees freedom to agree on a date of termination considered beneficial to both.

The objectives of government in passing s. 9(a) of the Code, the majority concludes, were pressing and substantial. Government objectives were to preserve the integrity of pension plans and to foster the prospects of younger workers. The majority of the Court finds that the legislature was faced with a complex socio-economic problem. In these circumstances, the majority considers that the limitation of protection in the Code is rationally connected to the objectives and that it minimally impairs the equality rights of older workers. Government had a reasonable basis for imposing what is a generally beneficial rule. The courts should adopt a stance that encourages legislative advances in the protection of human rights. But the courts should not lightly use the Charter to second-guess the judgment of a legislature as to just how quickly it should proceed in moving forward towards equality.

The appeal is dismissed.

In dissent, Wilson J. rejects the view, adopted by the majority of the Court, that the freedom guaranteed by the Charter is freedom for private individuals from government intervention. She finds that in Canada government has traditionally played a role in the creation and preservation of a just society. The state has been looked to and has responded to demands that Canadians be guaranteed adequate health care, access to education and a minimum level of financial security. Freedom has often required the intervention and protection of government against private action.

Wilson J. finds that where entities are not self-evidently part of the legislative, executive or administrative branch of government, some questions should be asked to determine whether the Charter applies. Does government control the entity in question? Does it perform a traditional government function or a function recognized as a responsibility of the state? Does it act pursuant to statutory powers given to it to further a government or public interest objective? Given the connections between governments and universities, and given that education at every level is a traditional function of government in Canada, Wilson J. concludes that universities form part of government for the purposes of s. 32 of the Charter.

Mandatory retirement is the law of the workplace at the universities, and, as such, Wilson J. finds that it is "law" within the meaning of s. 15. But s. 15 does not require that there be a discriminatory law, only that there be discrimination which must be redressed by the law.

Section 15 is infringed, Wilson J. concludes, because the mandatory retirement policies of the universities were based on the assumption that with age comes increasing incompetence.

Turning to s. 1, Wilson J. finds that the mandatory retirement policies are not saved by s. 1 because they do not impair the equality right as little as possible. There is no justification in this case to apply a relaxed s. 1 test. Where the legislature is forced to strike a balance between the claims of competing groups, and particularly where the legislature has sought to promote or protect the interests of vulnerable or less advantaged groups, the Court should approach the application of the minimal impairment test with a healthy measure of restraint. However, the universities seek to reap the benefit of this more flexible test fashioned in Irwin Toy on the basis that their mandatory retirement policy was intended to make available positions for younger academics. Young academics are not the kind of "vulnerable" group contemplated in Irwin Toy.

Wilson J. also finds that s. 9(a) of the Ontario Human Rights Code violates s. 15 because it strips persons over age 65 of all protection against employment discrimination. Once the government decides to provide protection it must do so in a non-discriminatory manner.

Section 9(a) should be struck down in its entirety, Wilson J. concludes. It cannot be saved by s. 1 since it cannot pass the minimal impairment test. The majority of individuals affected by s. 9(a) will suffer greater hardship because of the infringement of their rights. Therefore, the provision cannot be said to impair their rights as little as possible.

Wilson J. would declare that the university policies requiring mandatory retirement at age 65 violate s. 15 of the Charter and are of no force and effect. She would also order reinstatement in employment for the appellants with all the attendant benefits, and compensation for losses incurred because of the breach of rights.

L'Heureux-Dubé J., dissenting, concludes that the Charter does not apply to universities. However, she finds that s. 9(a) of the Ontario Human Rights Code violates s. 15 and cannot be saved by s. 1.

Français:  À la majorité, la Cour suprême du Canada statue que la retraite obligatoire à l’âge de 65 ans est une limite raisonnable au droit de protection contre la discrimination fondée sur l’âge prévu à l'aarticle 15. Dans le cadre de cinq arrêts distincts, la Cour suprême prononce une décision mitigée de 5 à 2.

Le tribunal est saisi du pourvoi contre une décision de la Cour d'aappel de l’Ontario qui avait rejeté la demande de huit professeurs et d’un bibliothécaire de quatre universités de l’Ontario portant que les politiques des universités en matière de retraite obligatoire à l’âge de 65 ans violent l'aarticle 15 de la Charte et que l'aalinéa 9a) du Code des droits de la personne du Ontario, en ne traitant pas les personnes âgées de plus de 65 ans de la même manière que les autres, enfreint également l'aart. 15.

La Cour est saisie des questions suivantes:

  1. La Charte canadienne des droits et libertés s'aapplique-t-elle aux universités?
  2. En supposant qu’elle s’y applique, les politiques des universités concernant la retraite obligatoire à l'âge de 65 ans violent-elles l'aart. 15?
  3. La restriction de l’interdiction de toute discrimination fondée sur l'âge du Code ontarien des droits de la personne, aux personnes de 18 à 65 ans, viole-t-elle l'aart 15?
  4. Si la restriction viole l'aart. 15, est-elle justifiable en vertu de l'aarticle premier en tant que limite raisonnable au droit d'égalité?

Le juge La Forest, s’exprimant au nom de la majorité, déclare que la Charte est essentiellement un instrument de contrôle des pouvoirs du gouvernement sur le particulier. L’exclusion des activités privées de l'aapplication de la Charte n’est pas le fruit du hasard. Bien que les atteintes aux droits des particuliers puissent provenir du secteur privé, le gouvernement peut soit les réglementer, soit créer des organismes distincts afin de protéger les droits de la personne. L’examen constitutionnel des actions de nature privée n’est pas mandaté par la Charte et restreindrait la liberté d'aaction des particuliers.

L'aart. 32 de la Charte précise que la Charte s'aapplique à la législature et au gouvernement de chaque province. La majorité conclut que les universités ne font pas partie du gouvernement au sent de l'aart. 32. La Cour rejette les prétentions à l’effet que la Charte s'aapplique aux universités parce qu’elles sont créées par la loi et rendent un important service public, ou parce que leur survie dépend de fonds publics, ou parce que leurs pouvoirs, leurs objets, leurs activités et leur structure réglementaire sont déterminés par le gouvernement. Malgré tous ces contrôles, conclut la majorité, les universités sont légalement autonomes; elles voient à leurs propres affaires et sont indépendantes du gouvernement à l'égard de toutes les importantes questions d’ordre interne. Leurs décisions ne sont pas des décisions du gouvernement.

Bien que la majorité de la Cour statue que la Charte ne s'aapplique pas aux universités, elle se penche néanmoins sur la question de savoir si les politiques de retraite obligatoire violent l'aart. 15.

En premier lieu, la majorité détermine que, si les universités faisaient partie de l'aappareil du gouvernement, leurs politiques de retraite obligatoire équivaudraient à une "loi" au sens de l'aart 15. Tous les actes accomplis en application des pouvoirs accordés par la loi, et non seulement les activités législatives, feraient partie du cadre de l'aart. de la Charte.

La majorité conclut que les politiques des universités violent l'aart. 15. La retraite obligatoire prive une personne de travail, l’un des aspects les plus fondamentaux de la vie d’une personne, sur la base de l’hypothèse que, en raison de son âge, la personne est moins compétente qu’une personne plus jeune.

Par ailleurs, les politiques de retraite obligatoire pourraient être sauvegardées par l'aarticle premier parce qu’elles imposent une limite raisonnable aux droits d'égalité garantis aux personnes plus âgées.

Les politiques de retraite obligatoire des universités sont motivées par des objectifs urgents et réels. Elles doivent accroître et conserver leurs aptitudes à rechercher et à maintenir l’excellence en faisant usage de souplesse dans la répartition des ressources et le renouvellement du corps professoral, et préserver la liberté académique et la collégialité en réduisant autant que possible les modes importuns d’évaluation du rendement.

La retraite obligatoire supporte le régime de la permanence car elle permet d'éviter les plans d'évaluation complexes et veille au renouvellement des membres du corps professoral en rendant des postes accessibles à de nouveaux professeurs plus jeunes. Il y a donc un lien rationnel entre les politiques des universités et les objectifs visés.

Quant à la question de savoir si les politiques portent le moins possible atteinte aux droits des travailleurs plus âgés, la majorité statue que le critère n’est pas de savoir si les droits sont affectés le moins possible, mais si l’université était raisonnablement fondée à conclure que la politique portait le moins possible atteinte aux droits. Cette version plus souple du critère de l'aarticle premier a été adoptée dans l'aarrêt Irwin Toy Ltd. c. Québec (Procureur général) afin d’offrir une plus grande flexibilité dans l'évaluation des cas où les législateurs doivent faire des choix difficiles entre les revendications contraires de groupes.

Dans le cas présent, la majorité conclut que les universités étaient raisonnablement fondées à conclure que leur politique portait le moins possible atteinte aux droits parce que la retraite obligatoire n’était pas entièrement au détriment du groupe visé. La politique veille à ce que les membres du corps professoral jouissent d’une grande liberté académique et elle est généralement bénéfique à la fois aux universités et aux personnes qui en font partie. Ainsi, l'aatteinte minimale aux droits ne l’emporte pas sur les objectifs urgents et réels des universités.

Ayant statué que la Charte ne s'aapplique pas aux universités, la Cour se penche sur la question de savoir si l'alinéa 9a) du Code ontarien des droits de la personne contrevient au par. 15(1) de la Charte du fait qu’il restreint l'aapplication de l’interdiction de toute discrimination fondée sur l'âge aux personnes âgées de 18 à 65 ans, et permet l’existence de politiques de retraite obligatoire pour les personnes âgées de plus de 65 ans. Certains membres du corps professoral, des appelants dans la présente cause, ont demandé l'aautorisation de déposer une plainte devant la Commission ontarienne des droits de la personne, mais l'aautorisation leur a été refusée en raison de la compétence restreinte de la Commission concernant la discrimination fondé sur l'âge.

La majorité de la Cour a rappelé que les politiques en matière de retraite obligatoire ont vu le jour avec l'aadoption des régimes de retraite privés et publics. Les politiques en matière de retraite obligatoire ont eu une grande incidence sur l’organisation du marché du travail et la structure des régimes de retraite, sur l'équité et la permanence au travail, et sur les possibilités d’emploi pour les autres. L’un des objectifs de l'alinéa 9a) du Code des droits de la personne du Ontario était d'aarriver à un compromis législatif entre protéger les individus contre la discrimination et donner aux employeurs et employés la liberté de s’entendre sur une date de cessation d’emploi convenant aux deux parties.

Selon les conclusions de la majorité, le gouvernement avait ratifié l'alinéa 9a) du Code pour des objectifs urgents et réels. Le gouvernement visait à conserver l'intégrité des régimes de retraite et à améliorer les perspectives d'aavenir des jeunes travailleurs. La majorité de la Cour conclut que la législature faisait face à un problème d’ordre socio-économique. Dans ces circonstances, elle considère que la restriction de la protection en vertu du Code a un lien rationnel avec les objectifs et porte le moins possible atteinte aux droits d'égalité des travailleurs plus âgés. Le gouvernement était raisonnablement fondé à imposer une règle qui est généralement bénéfique. Les tribunaux devraient adopter une position qui favorise les progrès législatifs sur le plan de la protection des droits de la personne. Par ailleurs, les tribunaux ne devraient pas se servir à la légère de la Charte pour se prononcer après coup sur le jugement du législateur afin de déterminer le rythme qu’il devrait emprunter pour parvenir à l'idéal de légalité.

L'aappel est rejeté.

Le juge Wilson, dissidente, rejette la vue adoptée par la majorité à l’effet que la liberté garantie par la Charte est la libération des particuliers de l’intervention du gouvernement. Elle affirme que le gouvernement au Canada a traditionnellement joué un rôle dans la création et le maintien d’une juste société. On s’est adressé à l’État et celui-ci a toujours répondu aux demandes visant à assurer aux Canadiens des soins de santé adéquats, l'aaccès à la formation et un niveau minimum de sécurité financière. La liberté a souvent exigé l’intervention et la protection du gouvernement contre l'aaction privée.

Wilson J. Conclut qu’il faut se poser les questions suivantes quant aux entités dont il n’est pas évident en soi qu’elles font partie des branches législative, exécutive ou administrative du gouvernement, pour déterminer si elles sont assujetties à la Charte. Le gouvernement exerce-t-il un contrôle sur l’entité en question? L’entité exerce-t-elle une fonction gouvernementale traditionnelle ou une fonction qui, de nos jours, est reconnue comme une responsabilité de l'État? L'entité agit-elle conformément au pouvoir que la loi lui a expressément conféré en vue d'aatteindre un objectif que le gouvernement cherche à promouvoir dans le plus grand intérêt public? En raison des divers liens qui existent entre les gouvernements et les universités, et étant donné que la formation à tous les niveaux est une fonction traditionnelle du gouvernement au Canada, Wilson J. Conclut que les universités font partie du gouvernement aux fins de l'aart. 32 de la Charte.

La retraite obligatoire est la loi du milieu de travail universitaire et est, comme telle, la "loi" au sens de l'aart 15, selon Wilson J. Mais l'aart 15 n’exige pas de chercher une loi discriminatoire, mais simplement de chercher une discrimination à laquelle la loi doit remédier.

L'aart. 15 est violé déclare Wilson J., parce que les politiques de retraite obligatoire des universités sont fondées sur l’hypothèse qu’il y a diminution de la compétence ave l'âge.

Wilson J. déclare que les politiques de retraite obligatoire ne sont pas sauvegardées par l'aarticle premier parce qu’elles ne portent pas le moins possible atteinte au droit d'égalité. Dans la présente cause, rien ne justifie l'aapplication d’un critère plus souple en vertu de l'aarticle premier. Lorsque la législature est forcée d'établir l'équilibre entre les revendications contraires de groupes, et notamment lorsque la législature a cherché à promouvoir ou à protéger les intérêts de groupes vulnérables ou moins avantagés, la Cour devrait envisager avec circonspection l'aapplication du critère de l'aatteinte minimale. D'aautre part, les universités cherchent à profiter des avantages du critère plus souple élaboré dans la causeIrwin Toy sur la base que leur politique de retraite obligatoire vise à rendre des postes accessibles aux plus jeunes professeurs. Les jeunes professeurs ne font pas partie du genre de groupe "vulnérable" envisagé dans l'arrêt Irwin Toy.

Wilson J. conclut également que l'alinéa 9a) du Code ontarien des droits de la personne enfreint l'aart. 15 parce qu’il prive les personnes âgées de plus de 65 ans de la protection contre la discrimination en matière d’emploi. Lorsque le gouvernement décide d'aaccorder une protection, il doit le faire d’une manière non discriminatoire.

L'alinéa 9a) en entier devrait être invalidé, conclut Wilson J. Il ne peut être sauvegardé par l'aarticle premier puisqu’il ne peut se conformer au critère de l'aatteinte minimale. Si la majorité des personnes touchées par l'alinéa 9a) souffrent un préjudice démesurément grave par suite de la violation de leurs droits, la loi contestée ne porte pas le moins possible atteinte à leurs droits.

Wilson J. déclarerait que les politiques des universités exigeant la retraite obligatoire à l'âge de 65 ans violent l'aarticle 15 de la Charte et sont nulles et invalides. Elle ordonnerait également la réintégration des appelants à leurs postes, ainsi qu’à tous les avantages connexes, et des dommages-intérêts compensatoires au titre de l'aatteinte à leurs droits.

Le juge L’Heureux-Dubé, dissidente, conclut que la Charte ne s'aapplique pas aux universités. Elle conclut par ailleurs que l'alinéa 9a) du Code ontarien des droits de la personne enfreint l'aart. 15 et ne peut être sauvegardé par l'aarticle premier.

This summary appears under: 
Donate Now Through CanadaHelps.org! Faire un don maintenant par CanadaHelps.org!

CHRR decisions are only available from Canadian Human Rights Reporter Inc.

CHRR decisions are not included in LawSource (Westlaw), Quicklaw (LexisNexis) or CanLII.